Genealogy - KNIGHTs from Continental Europe to England/Ireland, to Philadelphia (PA), to France - Sept. 2016

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Sir Waleran FITZ WILLIAM, Lord Of Dean [4561]
Waleran, [4563]
(Abt 1040-Abt 1100)
Sir William FITZ WALERAN, Lord of Dean [4562]
(1065-1114)
Sir Waleran FITZ WILLIAM, Lord Of Dean [4561]
(1090-1131)

 

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Spouses/Children:
Unknown

Sir Waleran FITZ WILLIAM, Lord Of Dean [4561]

  • Born: 1090, West Dean, Gloucestershire, England
  • Marriage: Unknown
  • Died: 1131, , Wiltshire, England at age 41

   Another name for Waleran was Walter I WALERAN.

  Sources, Comments and Notes

Source <The Government of England Under Henry I> Par Judith A. Green:
"WALERAN. SON OF WILLIAM
office: accounts for the New Forest 1129-30.
background: possibly successor of Waleran venator, lord of West Dean in 1086.
lands held: not known.
relatives associated with royal government: possibly Waleran venator and Walter Walerand, the latter being warden of the New Forest in the reign of Henry II."
________________________
Source <https://familysearch.org/tree/#view=ancestor&person=LHL2-2J1&spouse=9QQG-MJ7>:
"Waleran Fitz William
Birth 1116 West Dean, Gloucestershire, England
Death Bef Sept 1159
Father William Fitz Waleran 1093-1131
Child Walter de Waleran 1160-1201"
_________________________
Source <http://www.thefifeheadtree.btck.co.uk/Roots-WhatsinaName/WalerananddeNevilleFamilies>:
"The Lands of Waleran
Prior to 1066, Fifehead Neville was held by an unnamed English thegn (nobleman), but by the time of the completion of the Domesday Book in 1087, the manor of Fifehead Neville is recorded as being in the possession of Waleran Venator. The name Waleran (meaning Wall or 'Strong' Raven the Huntsman) is Germainic, and was introduced to Britain by the Anglo-Saxons in the eighth century, but was also re-introduced at the Conquest by the Norman-French. Waleran could possibly have been a native Englishman, but it is more likely that he was a Norman invader, who accompanied William I on his Conquest, and as a favourite was rewarded with huge hunting estates. His under-tenant in Fifehead Neville was Ingelrann, who also held land in Somerset after the Conquest (see Domesday Fifehead). ...

Descendants of Waleran
The records of the transfer of Waleran's lands to his heirs are very scarce so the details are somewhat sketchy and contradictory, and all dates given here are approximate: After his death in about 1100, Waleran's lands passed to his son William Fitzwaleran (b.1065). His son, Waleran Fitzwilliam (b.1090), was an Officer of the New Forest where in 1130 he is recorded paying the dues he had collected. He became Lord of Dean. His son was Walter Waleran (1120-1155) and his grandson, also Walter Waleran(d) is also recorded as paying the dues for the New Forest in 1156. The "Carte Baronumde Militibus" of 1166 was an enquiry set up by Henry II to list all the tenants who held knight's service to his tenants-in-chief. This Carta records the names of three of Walerand's knights, Julian of Manestone, John de Vifhida and Thomas de Winterbome, who probably derived their names from the same manors held by Waleran in 1086. ..."


Waleran married.




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